Advent - Week two

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Advent - Week two

Salt & Light is featuring excerpts from various sources each week this December to share a taste of fresh perspectives on the familiar accounts about the coming of Jesus Christ.

Why did Jesus come? Why did He leave his rightful place in glory, alongside the Father, to become like us? Why did he humbly enter our world as a helpless infant and dwell among us?

in The Dawning of Indestructible Joy, John Piper explains:

So two times John tells us that Christmas happened--the Son of God became human--to take away sin, or to destroy the works of the Devil, namely sin. Jesus was born of a virgin and increased in wisdom and in stature and in favour with God and man and was perfectly obedient and sinless in all his life and ministry, all the way to the cross in order to destroy the works of the Devil--to take away sin.

In Beloved Dust, co-authors  Jamin Goggin and Kyle Strobel add to Piper's 'why':

Salvation is a family issue, so God sent His Son. We can often neglect his reality and try to make salvation simply a legal issue, as if our relationship with God is forged in the courtroom alone. This unfortunately reduces the gospel so much that it loses its vitality. It is a move to make it more palatable, more understandable. Rather, the provocative reality of the gospel is that in Christ's Sonship we become sons and daughters of God. It is not in a courtroom, but in a family where we come to know ourselves as children of God. The Son of God took on dust and was faithful in our place so that we, too, could be children of God. God sent forth His Son because He was not simply dealing with legal issues--He was dealing with family issues. God did not send the Son only for forgiveness; He sent the Son so that we could truly partake of the life of love shared between the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. 

 

Jesus came into our world to experience what we experience in order to save. And He came because of love. Piper urges us not to leave Christmas in the abstract:  

Our sin. Make this personal and love him for it. Take the very personal words of the apostle Paul and make them you own: The life I now live in the flesh, I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me. (Galatians 2:20)

Don't leave Christmas in the abstract. Your sin. Your conflict with the Devil. Your victory. He came for this.

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Advent - Week one

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Advent - Week one

Salt & Light is featuring excerpts from various sources each week this December to share a taste of fresh perspectives on the familiar accounts about the coming of Jesus Christ.

In his book The Dawning of Indestructible Joy, John Piper offers a daily devotion for the season of advent, the season of waiting on a Saviour. His purpose in writing is to remind readers of “the greatness of the old truths.”

Piper describes the coming of Jesus Christ to dwell as man on earth as God’s Search-and-Save Mission.  (The Son of Man came to seek and to save the lost. Luke 19:10)

The word advent means “coming”. In this season of the year we focus on the meaning of the coming of the Son of God into the world. And the spirit of our celebration should be the spirit in which he came…:

Luke 19:10 “The Son of Man came to seek and to save the lost.” 

The coming of Jesus was a search and save mission…

So Advent is a season for thinking about the mission of God to seek and to save the lost people from the wrath to come. God raised him from the dead, “Jesus who delivers us from the wrath to come” (1 Thess 1:10) It’s a season for cherishing and worshipping this characteristic of God—that he is a searching and saving God, that he is a God on a mission, that he is not aloof or passive or indecisive. He is never in the maintenance mode, coasting or drifting. He is sending, pursuing, searching, saving. That’s the meaning of Advent...

Jesus came into the world at the first Advent and every Advent since is a reminder of his continual advent into more and more lives. And that Advent is, in fact, our advent—our coming, our moving into the lives of those around us and into the peoples of the world.    

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